You Are Viewing All Posts In The Boxing Category

After long layoff, Victor Ortiz ready to get back to boxing against Luis Collazo

Decrease fontDecrease font
Enlarge fontEnlarge font
Losses to Floyd Mayweather and Josesito Lopez derailed Victor Ortiz's rise, but he's back with a vengeance after 19 months (Grant Hindsley/AP

Losses to Floyd Mayweather and Josesito Lopez derailed Victor Ortiz’s rise, but he’s ready to get back in the ring. (Grant Hindsley/AP)

NEW YORK — Three years ago Victor Ortiz was on top of the boxing world, a welterweight champion barreling towards a showdown with pound-for-pound king Floyd Mayweather. He was young, good looking with a compelling back story, a true star on the rise.

Today, Ortiz is something else entirely.

Read More…


  • Published On Jan 29, 2014
  • Mikey Garcia remains undefeated by taking out Juan Carlos Burgos at MSG

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font
    Mikey Garcia (left) was rarely seriously threatened by Juan Carlos Burgos during the fight. (Gregory Payan/AP)

    Mikey Garcia (left) was rarely seriously threatened by Juan Carlos Burgos during the fight. (Gregory Payan/AP)

    NEW YORK — Three thoughts on Mikey Garcia’s unanimous decision win over Juan Carlos Burgos and Bryant Jennings’ knockout win over Artur Szpilka at Madison Square Garden:

    Read More…


  • Published On Jan 26, 2014
  • Manny Pacquiao and Timothy Bradley set for rematch in April

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font
    Manny Pacquiao (right) will look to hand Timothy Bradley his first loss when the two meet in April.

    Manny Pacquiao (right) will look to hand Timothy Bradley his first loss when the two meet in April. (Chris Carlson/AP)

    NEW YORK — Eight-division champion Manny Pacquiao will challenge WBO welterweight titleholder Timothy Bradley on April 12th at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Top Rank announced on Saturday. Pacquiao-Bradley will be a rematch of the controversial 2012 fight that Bradley won in a highly disputed decision.

    Read More…


  • Published On Jan 25, 2014
  • Three Thoughts: Curtis Stevens dominates in first-round knockout of Patrick Majewski

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font
    Curtis Stevens

    Curtis Stevens cruised to a knockout win against overmatched Patrick Majewski. (Rich Graessle/Icon SMI)

    ATLANTIC CITY — Three thoughts on the card headlined by Curtis Stevens first round knockout win over Patrick Majewski:

    Welcome back, Curtis Stevens

    Stevens, 28, took the toughest loss of his career in the biggest fight of his career against Gennady Golovkin last November. But Stevens — who missed most of 2010 and all of 2011 in a promotional dispute — was determined to get back in the ring quickly. Against Majewski, Stevens (26-4) vowed to be more aggressive, to not think as much in the ring. That’s what he did, dropping Majewski three times en route to an easy knockout win.

    It’s difficult to discern whether Stevens made any real improvements since the Golovkin fight; Majewski, who went the distance in a loss to middleweight contender Patrick Nielsen last September, was completely overmatched, getting dropped by a jab on the first knockdown and getting overwhelmed by a flurry of power punches at the end. Still, it was an impressive comeback win for Stevens less than three months after such a devastating defeat. 

    Where now, Curtis?

    It’s a simple fact of boxing: If you can talk a good game and back it up with crunching power, you can climb back into the world title picture quickly. Stevens does both. The 160-pound division is rich with television friendly talent, but the most appealing candidate for Stevens could be WBO titleholder Peter Quillin. Quillin has struggled finding marketable opponents while Stevens promoter, Kathy Duva, told SI.com that she would like to get Stevens back in the ring quickly. There are plenty of politics involved — Stevens fought his last fight on HBO and Quillin fights exclusively on Showtime — but Quillin-Stevens would be a dynamic fight at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn

    The rise of Thabiso Mchunu continues

    On the televised undercard cruiserweight Thabiso Mchunu scored his second straight significant victory, outpointing Olanrewaju Durodola. The compact, 5-foot-8 Mchunu is masterful at fighting taller opponents; he stays in a tight crouch and counterpunches with superior speed. Durodola looked uncomfortable against Mchunu throughout he fight, and there was an unusual amount of back and forth between fighter and trainer between rounds. For Mchunu though, it was another dominating win. Most of the top 200-pounders are in Europe, but the South African born Mchunu is rapidly moving up the cruiserweight rankings on his way to a world title shot.

    – By Chris Mannix


  • Published On Jan 25, 2014
  • Eager to move past loss, Curtis Stevens ready to take on all comers

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font
    Curtis Stevens was eager to get back into the ring even after falling to Gennady Golovkin in November. (Rich Graessle/Icon SMI)

    Curtis Stevens was eager to get back into the ring even after falling to Gennady Golovkin in November. (Rich Graessle/Icon SMI)

    ATLANTIC CITY — He watched the fight just once, but for Curtis Stevens one viewing of his November loss to middleweight kingpin Gennady Golovkin was enough to burn every detail into his memory. Sitting outside Gallagher’s Steakhouse this week, Stevens was able to recall every mistake he made against Golovkin. Backing up too much. Not letting his hands go enough. Too much time spent looking for the perfect shot.

    Read More…


  • Published On Jan 24, 2014
  • Looking at options after Vitali Klitschko’s decision to vacate WBC title

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font
    After fighting Francesco Pianeta in May, Wladimir Klitschko is expected to face Alexander Povetkin. (Nadine Rupp/Bungarts/Getty Images)

    Wladimir Klitschko may get a chance to unify his title with the vacated title of his brother Vitali. (Nadine Rupp/Bungarts/Getty Images)

    Vitali Klitschko’s decision to vacate his WBC heavyweight title has created a scramble among boxers eager to fight for the coveted belt. On Tuesday, top contenders Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder engaged in (another) vulgar exchange on social media, while Bermane Stiverne and Chris Arreola both have made cases that they deserve a title shot.

    How will it sort out? Here’s a suggested scenario:

    Make Stiverne-Fury for the vacant title: Last April, Bermane Stiverne (23-1) beat Chris Arreola in a WBC eliminator, establishing Stiverne as the No. 1 contender on the WBC rankings. Whether he earned the right to be in an eliminator is debatable — boxing insiders get a good laugh out of the WBC’s monthly rankings, as they often appear to ignore merit — but Stiverne did win the fight.

    Tyson Fury (21-0) is ranked No. 8 by the WBC, but his résumé is more complete than that of anyone ranked above him, a list that includes Bryant Jennings, Mike Perez and Dereck Chisora. Fury owns wins over Chisora, Steve Cunningham and Kevin Johnson in the last two years. His activity — he has not fought since stopping Cunningham last April — has been limited by the postponement and ultimate cancellation of a fight against David Haye. Still, among heavyweight contenders, Fury is as worthy as any to fight for a vacant title.

    Make the new titleholder face the winner of Arreola-Wilder: Quality heavyweight fights in the U.S. have been scarce in recent years; Arreola-Wilder would be one of them. When Arreola (36-3) is in shape — as he was during a first-round destruction of Seth Mitchell last September — he can be very good. What he lacks in technique he makes up for with an iron chin and crushing power. Deontay Wilder’s list of opponents is pathetic, and he has been wobbled by non-punchers in the past. But he also possesses thundering one-punch power and, at 6-foot-7, Wilder (30-0) has the kind of size that is difficult to match up with.

    It’s a classic crossroads matchup: Arreola, 32, the aging contender against Wilder, 28, the untested Olympic bronze medalist just entering his prime. It’s a fight Showtime would snap up in a heartbeat and it would produce a winner worthy of a title shot.

    Whoever emerges gets Wladimir Klitschko: Make no mistake, Klitschko is dying to unify the titles. When Vitali held the WBC belt, Wladimir said all the right things. Privately though, Wladimir badly wants to unify the titles. Klitschko figures to be tied up with mandatory defenses for the first half of 2014, leaving would-be WBC contenders to fight it out for the title. Whoever comes out of that scrum will not only be battle tested against two legitimate heavyweight opponents but will have an increased profile that will undoubtedly create a bidding war among premium networks to secure the rights to the fight.

    – By Chris Mannix


  • Published On Dec 17, 2013
  • Q&A with Amir Khan: Floyd Mayweather’s (possible) next opponent

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font
    Amir Khan is a British star who may be Floyd Mayweather's next opponent. (Scott Heavey/Getty Images)

    Amir Khan is a British star who may be Floyd Mayweather’s next opponent. (Scott Heavey/Getty Images)

    NEW YORK — Former unified junior welterweight titleholder Amir Khan — the leading candidate to face Floyd Mayweather next May — sat down with SI.com on Wednesday to discuss Mayweather, his pairing with Virgil Hunter and the criticism that his weak chin will prevent him from ever becoming an elite fighter again

    SI.com: So, you are fighting Floyd Mayweather…

    Amir Khan: That’s your first question, huh?

    SI.com: Well why beat around the bush?

    AK: Well it’s a fight I’d love to have. That’s what I’m supposed to say, right? Floyd is the best fighter out there and you would love to see how you fight against the best. I’m not going to shy away from that fight. Styles make fights and I know for a fact that I will do better than most of the guys that he has fought. I’ll beat him. My speed and movement will give Floyd problems. I’m not taking any time off. I know that’s a fight that will change my life. That’s why I’m so focused on winning it.

    SI.com: What about the argument that you have not earned the fight?

    AK: Well who else out there can give Floyd problems? No one. Danny Garcia? Floyd has fought many opponents like him. I have a style that has given him problems before. I’m an orthodox fighter who is quicker than him and faster than him. And if Floyd wants to be a global superstar, he has to fight me. It will make him popular in the UK and the Asia area.

    Read More…


  • Published On Dec 04, 2013
  • Manny Pacquiao flashes old dominance in decisive win over Brandon Rios

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font
    Brandon Rios (left) had trouble handling Manny Pacquiao's combination of speed and power in Macau. (Vincent Yu/AP)

    Brandon Rios (left) had trouble handling Manny Pacquiao’s combination of speed and power in Macau. (Vincent Yu/AP)

    Three thoughts on Manny Pacquiao’s lopsided unanimous decision win over Brandon Rios for the WBO international welterweight title in Macau:

    Pacquiao is back. In the aftermath of a horrifying knockout loss to Juan Manuel Marquez last December, questions about whether Pacquaio would be the same fighter lingered. But while Pacquiao is not the same human wrecking ball he was through 2009, he proved against Rios that, at 34, he still has plenty left. Boxing brilliantly, Pacquiao moved in, out and around Rios, peppering him with combinations, bruising his face with thudding power shots. It was an easy fight to score — evidenced by the 120-108, 119-109 and 118-110 scorecards — with little controversy.

    Rios was selected for this fight for a reason: He’s a tough guy with a television-friendly style who is easy to hit. Pacquiao needed a confidence-rebuilding fight, and he got it against Rios, who, save for a handful of decent punches, was never able to mount much of a threat. The punch stats backed that up: Per CompuBox, Pacquiao landed 281 of 790 (36 percent) while Rios connected on 138 of 502 (27 percent)

    Thanks for coming, Brandon. Few expected Rios to beat Pacquiao. But Rios’ unwillingness to go for broke, to chase a knockout when it was clear he was way down late in the fight was disappointing. Rios and his team talked tough before the fight but did little to back it up. He never adjusted to Pacquiao’s speed, and despite his insistence that he wasn’t bothered by Pacquiao’s power, refused to stand and trade shots with him. For a $4 million payday, Rios left little doubt that he is not in Pacquiao’s class, and probably never will be.

    Moving on. Let’s get this out of the way right now: A Floyd Mayweather fight isn’t happening. Money and politics scuttled any chance of that fight long ago. Moreover, making that fight right now, after years of frustrating excuses from both sides, would be insulting. Pacquiao has clearly lost a step, clearly isn’t the same fighter who emerged as the best in the world from 2008 to 2010. It would do nothing to settle the dispute of who is the best fighter in this generation.

    For Pacquiao (55-5-2), a fifth fight against Marquez is a likely option. Marquez has not committed to continuing his career following a loss to Timothy Bradley, but another career-high payday against Pacquiao would be a nice carrot to lure him back to the ring. For all the talk about Pacquiao-Marquez fatigue, the two have rarely fought a dull round, much less fight, and it guarantees more than one million pay-per-view buys. Putting the fight in Mexico could create a little more spice to matchup.

    Rios (31-2) has plenty of options, too. A third fight against Mike Alvarado is inevitable and a matchup against the rugged Ruslan Provodnikov would be a can’t-miss. Expect him to get a softer touch in his next fight to rebuild his confidence after back-to-back losses, then get right back in the ring for a high profile matchup.

    – Chris Mannix


  • Published On Nov 24, 2013
  • Manny Pacquiao wins unanimous decision over Brandon Rios in Macau

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font

    Manny Pacquiao (left) shook off an 11-month layoff to defeat Brandon Rios in a unanimous decision. (Dale de la Rey/AFP/Getty Images)

    Manny Pacquiao (left) shook off an 11-month layoff to defeat Brandon Rios in a unanimous decision. (Dale de la Rey/AFP/Getty Images)

    After a lay-off of 11 months, Manny Pacquiao got back in the ring Saturday in Macau, where he won a unanimous decision over American Brandon Rios and captured the WBO international welterweight title.

    The judges scored the bout 120-108, 119-109, 118-110 for Pacquiao, who moved deftly while scoring well-executed combinations in winning round after round. Rios found few opportunities to unleash the power that gave rise to his nickname, Bam Bam.

    “Manny Pacquiao is very fast. He’s fast, very awkward. His speed got me a little bit,” Rios said in a ring interview after the fight.

    The victory snaps a two-bout losing streak for Pacquiao, who had not stepped in a ring since being knocked out by Juan Manuel Marquez. Pacquiao has won 10 world titles in eight different weight classes and improved his career mark to 55-5-2 with the win over Rios.

    After the fight, Pacquiao indicated reports that he was considering retirement were premature, telling the crowd, “My time is not over.”


  • Published On Nov 24, 2013
  • Clash breaks out between Pacquiao’s trainer and Rios’ team

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font
    (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

    Manny Pacquiao’s trainer, Freddie Roach got into an expletive-filled confrontation with Alex Ariza, Pacquiao’s former strength coach. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

    A scuffle broke out between Manny Pacquiao’s trainer, Freddie Roach, and members of Brandon Rios’s team at a workout in Macau, China on Tuesday. During the expletive-filled confrontation, Alex Ariza, Pacquiao’s former strength coach who has clashed with Roach in the past, kicked Roach in the chest and can be heard on video mocking the symptoms of Roach’s Parkinson’s disease.

    Tensions boiled over around 11 am, when Roach arrived at the gym to prepare for Pacquiao’s workout. Rios and his team–including Ariza and trainer Robert Garcia–were finishing up. Roach approached Rios’s team aggressively and ordered them out of the gym. Garcia said his team was delayed by interviews and said “I ain’t going nowhere.” Roach and Ariza then started getting into it. Roach cursed at Ariza. Ariza began purposefully slurring his speech. When Roach moved towards Ariza, Ariza responded by kicking Roach in the chest.

    Read More…


  • Published On Nov 20, 2013


  •